Karnak Temple of Khonsu

Khonsu (Also known as Khons Khensu, Khuns)

Karnak-Khonsu1Khonsu was the son of Amun and Mut, with whom he formed the Theban triad. He was a moon god depicted as a man with a falcon-head wearing a crescent moon headdress surmounted by the full lunar disc. Like Thoth, who was also a lunar deity, he is sometimes represented as a baboon.

Khonsu was believed to have the ability to drive out evil spirits. Rameses II sent a statue of Khonsu to a friendly Syrian king in order to cure his daughter of an illness.

Karnak Temple of Khonsu

His temple, within the precincts of Karnak, was built by Ramesses III it consists of a peristyle court which is bordered by a portico of twenty-eight columns. There is also a hypostyle hall which is connected to the sanctuary of the barque with chapels open to the left and right and a staircase leading to the roof.

Temple of Khonsu at Karnak
Temple of Khonsu at Karnak

The whole pylon, built by measures 113 feet (34.5m) in length and 59 feet (18m) high. Four grooves are cut on its facade to house masts with banners.

In front of the pylon are the remnants of a colonnade bordered by a row of sphinxes.


First pylon
The first pylon was built by the Ethiopian kings (656 BC).

The Great Court
This vast Court holds the Kiosk of Tahraqa and the Second Pylon.

Ramesses III Chapel
First court is lined with Osride statues of Ramesses III

Hypostyle hall
Still the largest room of any religious building in the world

Tuthmosis III Hall
Obelisk of Hatshepsut & Festival Hall of Tuthmosis III

The Sacred Lake
The lake is 129 X 77 meters and was used for ritual navigation.

Thutmose III Pylon
The pylon shows Thutmose smiting his enemies.

Temple of Khonsu
Temple of the moon god Khonsu – son of Amun and Mut.



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