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Egypt’s Great Pyramid the new evidence


Egypt’s Great Pyramid The New Evidence has revealed that the Great Pyramid of Khufu was built using a complicated system of waterways.

Egypt’s Great Pyramid the new evidence

Thousands of workers transported 170,000 tonnes of limestone in wooden boats along the Nile River. Each 2.5-tonne block was ferried through specially built canals into an inland port at the foot of the Great Pyramid.

The discovery of an ancient papyrus diary, written by an overseer named Merer, is a first-hand record of how the pyramid was built.

Merer describes, in detail, how the limestone blocks were moved from the quarry in Tura to Giza in boats. This together with the unearthing of a lost waterway beneath the Giza plateau and the finding of a ceremonial boat, now strongly suggests that thousands of labourers transported the building blocks of the pyramid along the Nile River Nile, then through canals to the construction site.

Gold technology in ancient Egypt


MASTERY OF METAL WORKING METHODS
Thomas Garnet Henry James, CBE, FBA
The British Museum, London

Gold technology in ancient Egypt by Henry James

Gold technology in ancient Egypt FREE PDF

Thomas Garnet Henry James, CBE, FBAHenry James (8 May 1923 – 16 December 2009), was a British Egyptologist, epigrapher, and museum curator.

He is best known for his career long association with the British Museum, serving with the Department of Ancient Egypt from 1951 to 1988, including 14 years as Keeper.

He also had a large number of outside scholarly interests and wrote a large number of important research works on the subject of Ancient Egypt.

James was the inspiration behind the radical reorganisation of the Egyptian sculpture display AT The British Museum in 1981.
His name appears on a number of publications about objects in the British Museum. He also wrote a number of volumes on the Hieroglyphic Texts from Egyptian Stelae series in 1961 and 1970).

James co-wrote two important publications based on his own epigraphic work in the field: The Mastaba of Khentika called Ikhekhi (1953) and Gebel el-Silsilah. The Shrines (1963).

Gold technology in ancient Egypt

Gold technology in ancient Egypt FREE PDF

Newsletter 57 Ancient Lives by John Romer


Newsletter 57 Ancient Lives by John Romer

Part two of my tribute to John Romer – Ancient Lives

Newsletter 57 Ancient Lives by John Romer – In these videos, made in 1984, John Romer explores the ruins of an ancient village near Thebes, where generations of artists and craftsmen built the royal tombs. We see details of how ordinary Egyptians lived in ancient Egypt; their loves, their quarrels and even their dreams.

We go inside the pharaohs’ tombs, meet the scribes, stonemasons, and high priests who presided over this city of the dead. We also find out about the secrets of the tomb raiders and the tricks used to frustrate them.

This four-part documentary series provides fascinating insights into the ancient Egyptian people.

Ancient Lives 1 of 4

Ancient Lives 2 of 4

Ancient Lives 3 of 4

Ancient Lives 4 of 4

John Romer Egyptologist – Wikipedia

John Romer resource page

Newsletter 57 Ancient Lives by John Romer

“John Romer is an archeologist with a genius for raising the busy ghosts of ancient Egypt.”–Sunday Times

Newsletter 56 Romer’s Egypt all three Episodes


Newsletter 56 Romer's Egypt All three EpisodesNewsletter 56 Romer’s Egypt all three Episodes

I’m making the next few newsletters a tribute to John Romer He is one of the best known television presenters of ancient history and, like me, began as an artist then discovered archaeology through his art. His knowledge is expressed with humour, without being overly academic and a poignant respect for ancient peoples.

I first came across his work after my first expedition to Egypt in 1982. After my second day back in the UK I switched on the telly and was mesmerised by the initial episode of Romer’s Egypt. This was his first television series broadcast on BBC2 and spans Egyptian history from 5000BC to 30BC. The series has never been made available for sale on DVD and this You Tube reproduction of the three episodes was salvaged from a VHS recording. So it’s a bit rough in quality but  well worth watching for its rarity and the unique character of John Romer.

Romer’s Egypt Episode One 5000BC – 2215BC

Romer’s Egypt Episode Two 2700BC – 1070BC

Romer’s Egypt Episode Three 1570BC – 30BC

John Romer Egyptologist – Wikipedia

John Romer resource page

Newsletter 56 Romer’s Egypt all three Episodes

Newsletter 55 Thutmose III The Napoleon of Ancient Egypt


The Battle Of Megiddo The story of Tuthmosis III Video Documentary

This video is about my favourite pharaoh – Newsletter 55 Thutmose III The Napoleon of Ancient Egypt

In the second year of his reign, the young Thutmose found himself faced with a coalition of the princes from Kadesh and Megiddo, who had mobilized a large army. Undaunted, Thutmose immediately set out with his army and this first campaign revealed Thutmose to be the military genius of his time.

Thutmose conducted sixteen campaigns in Palestine, Syria and Nubia and his treatment of the conquered was always humane. He established a sort of “Pax Egyptica” over his empire. Syria and Palestine were obliged to keep the peace and the region as a whole experienced an unprecedented degree of prosperity.

Amunemhab one of Thutmose’s Generals

Amunemhab was a vigorous fighting man who saved the king’s life by cutting off a charging elephant’s trunk. Interestingly there are two records of this event; the official account and Amunemhab’s written on the wall of his tomb.

Thutmose’s official account from the Napata Stela
“Ra made me do something very brave at the sea of Niy. He made me run across a troop of 120 elephants and My Majesty fought them. Never had the like been done by a king since the god who first received the white crown of Upper Egypt. I say this without boasting and without lie therein“.

Amunemhab’s account of the same incident
“I beheld an excellent deed which the Lord of the Two Lands did in Niy. He hunted 120 elephants, for their tusks. The largest among them attempted to fight face to face with his majesty. As for me, I stood in the water between two rocks and cut off his hand while he was alive in front of his majesty. Then my lord rewarded me with gold and three changes of clothing”

From Ancient Egyptian Anecdotes